Tag Archives: Conference

TACF Annual Meeting 2015 with Schatz Tree Genetics Colloquium

The American Chestnut Foundation and Schatz Tree Genetics Colloquium present Integrating Genomics Tools in American Chestnut Restoration

Asheville, NC The American Chestnut Foundation (TACF) in collaboration with the Schatz Tree Genetics Colloquium presents Integrating Genomics Tools in American Chestnut Restoration on October 23-24, 2015 at the Penn Stater Conference Center Hotel in State College, PA. The event coincides with TACFs 2015 Annual Fall Meeting.

This unique 2-day workshop will feature scientists from around the world presenting research related to elements of chestnut genomics. Topics include genome sequencing, genetic mapping, marker-assisted selection techniques, and more.

Many hands-on learning opportunities are included such as DNA extraction in the lab and a chestnut genome sequencing workshop with the scientists who actually did the sequencing. There will also be a field trip to the Penn State Arboretums BC3F2 seed orchard to observe variation in form and resistance within the advanced chestnut generation families.

During a Q&A forum, workshop participants are encouraged to ask genetics-based questions of leading experts to learn more about American chestnut research in the fields of genomics and molecular genetics.

Dinner banquets and keynote addresses are scheduled for Friday and Saturday evenings. Speakers include Dr. Angus Dawe of New Mexico State University, Dr. Ron Sederoff of NC State University and Dr. Antoine Kremer of the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA). Please refer to the attachment to read the complete list of event speakers and presentation topics.

Registration fees for this event are minimal:  2-Day Student Pass = $35.00; 2-Day Adult Pass = $99.00; Daily passes also available.  Click here for event registration and program information.

About The American Chestnut Foundation
Once the mighty giants of the eastern forest, American chestnuts stood up to 100 feet tall, and numbered in the billions. From Maine to Georgia, the American chestnut was a vital part of the eastern forest, provided abundant food for wildlife, and was an essential component of the economy. In the beginning of the 20th century the fungal pathogen responsible for chestnut blight, accidentally imported from Asia, spread rapidly through the eastern forests. By 1950 the fungus had eliminated the American chestnut as a mature forest tree.

In 1983, a committed group of scientists decided to do something about this ecological disaster while the species could still be saved. They formed TACF to initiate a complex breeding program to transfer genes containing disease resistance from Asian chestnut species to American chestnut. In just 20 years, these talented scientists and volunteers began to produce the first generation of trees that are 96% American chestnut but contain Asiatic genes for blight resistance. Now supported by more than 5,000 members and hundreds of volunteers in 23 states, the organization is planting and testing offspring of those trees as it continues to build and improve its breeding population. With the aid of many partner organizations, TACF is leading the restoration of an iconic species once on the brink of extinction.

The American Chestnut Foundation is a non-profit conservation organization headquartered in Asheville, NC, with 3 regional offices located in Charlottesville, VA, So. Burlington, VT, and State College, PA. The organizations research farm in Meadowview, VA has more than 50,000 trees planted in various stages of development.  For more information on TACF and its work, contact TACF Director of Communications Ruth Goodridge at 828-281-0047, email: ruth.goodridge@acf.org. Please visit us online at: www.acf.org or on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/americanchestnut and Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/chestnu! t1904.

About the Schatz Tree Genetics Colloquium
Dr. Louis Schatz endowed the Schatz Center for Tree Molecular Genetics in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management at Pennsylvania State University in 1998. As part of this generous endowment, the Schatz Tree Genetics Colloquium is held every two years to provide a forum for tree genetics researchers and practitioners from around the world to review the state of the science in advanced tree genetics, propose the most promising avenues of future research, and consider joint research programs and agendas for funding by industrial, government and private sources.

The Schatz Center encompasses app. 2200 square feet of research space and 600 square feet of office space in the new Forest Resources Building.  The Schatz Center is composed of a Molecular Genetics Lab, a Quantitative Genetics Lab, a microscopy room, a tissue culture room, and equipment rooms for freezers, servers, autoclave and dishwasher.  The Schatz Center is well equipped for high throughput molecular genetics and genomics, including genetic mapping, genetic diversity, analysis of gene expression, and next generation sequencing of transcriptomes and bacterial, fungal and plant genomes.  To learn about projects underway in the Schatz Center, please visit the Schatz Center’s current projects page, under Research.

For more information contact:
Ruth Goodridge
Director of Communications
The American Chestnut Foundation
ruth@acf.org
(828) 281-0047

First International Rapid Cycle Crop-Breeding Conference Announcement

January, 7-10, 2014 – 18980 Upper Belmont Place Leesburg, VA 20176, US

Now more than ever, there is a need to rapidly improve perennial crops to meet the challenges of climate change, scarcity of labor, the desire for reduced chemical inputs, the spread of exotic pests and pathogens, and increasing demands for product quantity and quality.

Yet breeding of these long-generation-cycle crops remains a slow, arduous process that has changed little over time.  Limitations include long juvenility periods, requirements for extensive breeding plots with significant field costs, and yearly limitations on flowering and fruiting related to chill and heat requirements.  Research has focused on marker assisted selection, germplasm characterization, and genetic engineering as means to advance breeding, and significant successes have been achieved. However, the successes of these strategies are still limited by lengthy generation cycles.  There is a critical need for the development of systems to reliably shorten breeding cycles in order to take full advantage of advances in genetic knowledge for crop breeding. Strategies to reduce generation cycles have been based upon horticultural and environmental manipulations.  While these practices have been useful in specific cases, there is also a need to explore alternative approaches with broad applications such as the manipulation of genes that regulate juvenility, flowering, and seed production.

This conference seeks to gather experts in the fields of plant breeding, genetics, molecular biology, horticulture, forestry, plant physiology and related fields  to discuss approaches and present the latest findings related to the shortening of breeding cycles in long-generation cycle crops in order to more efficiently and effectively face the challenges of improving the worlds production of food and fiber.

More information is available at the event website: https://resweb.passkey.com/Resweb.do?mode=welcome_ei_new&eventID=10622861#

FAO Biotechnology Forum’s 19th e-mail Conference – March 4 to 24, 2013

We are happy to announce that the FAO Biotechnology Forum (http://www.fao.org/biotech/biotech-forum/) will host its next e-mail conference from 4 to 24 March 2013 and that its provisional title is “Current and future impacts of genomics for the crop, forestry, livestock, fishery and agro-industry sectors in developing countries”.

Genomics is the study of all the genetic material (genome) of an organism. The genomes of several hundred species, including mammals, fish, trees, crops, bacteria and viruses, have already been sequenced or are currently being sequenced. For example, the rice genome sequence was published in 2002 and the chicken genome sequence in 2004. Over time, genome sequencing has become much cheaper and quicker. This e-mail conference will look at the impacts that genomics is currently having on food and agriculture in developing countries as well as the potential impacts that it may have for developing countries in the future.

As usual, the conference is open to everyone, is free and will be moderated. To subscribe to the conference, send an e-mail to listserv@listserv.fao.org with the following one line in the body of the message (leave the subject line blank):
subscribe biotech-room3-L firstname lastname

Where firstname and lastname refer to the person’s first and last name. For example, if the subscriber’s name is John Smith, then the line should be:
subscribe biotech-room3-L John Smith

For more information, contact biotech-mod3@fao.org. A background document is being prepared and will be sent to Forum members before the conference begins. This is the 19th e-mail conference to be hosted by the FAO Biotechnology Forum since it was launched in the year 2000.

We ask you to please spread the word about this conference to others, so that people who might be interested in joining are aware about it.

Best regards

John

John Ruane, PhD
FAO Biotechnology Forum Administrator
E-mail address: Biotech-Admin@fao.org
Forum website http://www.fao.org/biotech/biotech-forum/
FAO Biotechnology website http://www.fao.org/biotech/
RSS on Biotechnology: http://www.fao.org/biotech/biotech-news/rss/en/

Participate in FAO’s E-mail Conference: GMOs in the Pipeline

Note, the IFB is participating in this e-mail conference, and we encourage anyone else in the biotech field to participate.

From 5 November to 2 December 2012 the FAO Biotechnology Forum is hosting its next e-mail conference on “GMOs in the pipeline: Looking to the next five years in the crop, forestry, livestock, aquaculture and agro-industry sectors in developing countries”. Its goal is to inform the debate about genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in the pipeline, considering the specific kind of GMOs that are likely to be commercialised in developing countries over the next five years and to discuss the likely implications of these new GMOs for developing countries. The conference is open to everyone, is free and will be moderated. To subscribe to the conference, send an e-mail to listserv@listserv.fao.org with the following one line in the body of the message (leave the subject line blank):
subscribe biotech-room2-L firstname lastname

Where firstname and lastname refer to the person’s first and last name. For example, if the subscriber’s name is John Smith, then the line should be:
subscribe biotech-room2-L John Smith

The background document to the conference is available from the Forum website, at http://www.fao.org/biotech/biotech-forum/en/. For more information, contact biotech-mod2@fao.org.

FROM THE BACKGROUND DOCUMENT – http://www.fao.org/docrep/016/ap109e/ap109e00.pdf

4. Specific points about this e-mail conference

This is the 18th e-mail conference to be hosted by the FAO Biotechnology Forum (http://www.fao.org/biotech/biotech-forum/en/) since it was launched in the year 2000. As with each conference hosted by the Forum, the focus is on applications in developing countries.

There are two main topics that people are asked to address in the conference:
4.1 What new GMOs are likely to be commercialized in developing countries within the next five years (i.e. before the end of 2017) in the crop, forestry, livestock, aquaculture and agro-industry sectors?

Specific questions that can be addressed regarding these new GMOs include:
4.1.1 Which species will they be?
4.1.2 Which traits will they have?
4.1.3 Will they be developed by the public sector, the private sector or through public-private partnerships?
4.1.4 Will they be produced in the developing countries themselves or, alternatively, will they be developed elsewhere (and then imported by developing countries for commercialization purposes)?
4.1.5 What kind of intellectual property management options will be exercised by the bodies commercializing these new GMOs?

4.2 What are the likely implications of these new GMOs for developing countries?

Specific questions that can be addressed regarding this topic include:
4.2.1 What are the likely implications of these new GMOs on food security and nutrition in developing countries?
4.2.2 What are the likely implications of these new GMOs on socio-economic conditions in developing countries?
4.2.3 What are the likely implications of these new GMOs on sustainable management of natural resources in developing countries?
4.2.4 What are the likely implications of these new GMOs on adaptation to climate change in developing countries?

4.3 Topics not covered by the conference

Each conference of the FAO Biotechnology Forum takes one particular theme that is relevant to agricultural biotechnologies in developing countries and opens it up for debate for a limited amount of time. This conference focuses on GMOs in the pipeline – those that are not yet released but which may be commercially available in developing countries within the next 5 years.

This conference does not include discussions on:
i) whether GMOs should or should not be used per se or the general attributes, positive or negative, of GMOs per se. (Instead, the goal is to discuss the specific kinds of GMOs that are in the near pipeline – which ones are likely to be commercialized in developing countries within the next 5 years and what their implications may be for developing countries).

ii) GMOs which are already commercially available in developing countries

(If they are already commercially available, they are not in the pipeline).

iii) GMOs that are imported to developing countries just for consumption, i.e. for food, feed and processing. (Instead, the conference focuses on the commercial release of the GMOs for use (cultivation/production) in the crop, forestry, livestock, aquaculture and agro-industry sectors in developing countries).

iv) The kinds of GMOs that are likely to be commercialized in developed countries within the next 5 years and what their implications may be for developed countries.

May 26 June 1, 2013 Tree Biotechnology 2013 Conference Asheville, NC

Forest Biosciences: Meeting the Needs of a Changing World

The world faces a growing threat from climate change and increasing shortages of food, fiber and fuel. Tree Biotechnology can provide solutions to circumvent these threats by supporting increases in wood production with fewer resources. The Tree Biotechnology 2013 Conference will convene in Asheville from May 26 June 1 2013, focusing on the present and future roles of forest biotechnology in supplying solutions to meet the needs of society.

PDF of the complete announcement: Save the date – IUFRO Tree Biotech 2013